How long should you keep your puppy in a crate?

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Editor of Dog Articles
Written By Editor of Dog Articles

Why Crate Train a Dog

There are a number of benefits to crate training. There are a number of reasons that crate training is done.

House training.

Dogs don’t like to take care of business when they sleep. It is possible to train a puppy to control their bowels and bladder by using short periods of time in a crate, slowly increasing the crate time as their control increases.

The number of accidents that occur inside can be reduced by crating a dog. They will associate the crate door opening with their need to go outside to take care of business if you take them out as soon as possible.

House Training

Dogs don’t like to take care of business when they sleep. It is possible to train a puppy to control their bowels and bladder by using short periods of time in a crate, slowly increasing the crate time as their control increases.

The number of accidents that occur inside can be reduced by crating a dog. They will associate the crate door opening with their need to go outside to take care of business if you take them out as soon as possible.

A crate is the perfect place for a puppy that isn’t yet aware of the rules or a grown dog that is mischievous. A crate keeps your dog contained, out of harm’s way, and keeps them from damaging the house.

When left alone for long periods of time, dogs can become bored easily. A crate provides a place that is all their own, and a confinement means they won’t be tearing up the house or making chew toys out of the beautiful new boots you just bought.

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Mobility

If you want to take your dog along on your travels or just want to take them to the park down the street or lake in the next county, transporting your dog in a crate is the safest way. It’s easier to take your dog in a car, SUV, or in the back of a truck with a crate-trained dog. Many states now require animals to be secured when in open-air Jeeps, truck beds, etc.

Smaller, soft-sided versions of a crate are required for smaller dogs traveling within the airplane’s cabin.

While traveling, you may find yourself in a home that isn’t particularly dog-friendly or where you have a need to be gone for longer periods of time and your host isn’t willing or able to have a dog roaming freely. If you don’t take your dog on your travels and they need to be kenneled, having them used to a smaller confined space will make their transition to boarding much easier.

Selecting a Crate for Your Dog

A variety of crates are available for dogs. Depending on the size, budget, and aesthetic of your dog, you can choose.

As a puppy grows, you can either buy a larger crate or graduate to a smaller one. Purchase a crate that can be moved to accommodate growth if you choose the latter. Buying a crate that doesn’t adjust will mean your puppy has room to sleep and use the crate as a bathroom. It’s definitely not something that you want to happen.

The crate should be large enough to allow movement for adult dogs. They will need to stand up and stretch and be able to turn around and find a comfy spot to relax in, so make sure both the height and length of the crate is appropriate. They will be tempted to urinate or defecate in the unused portion if they go too big.

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If you can’t take your pet with you to buy a crate or online, then make sure you get their measurements. Measure from the tip of the nose to the tail with your dog standing. To find the correct length of the crate, add two to four inches. Measure from the floor to the top of your dog’s head when they are sitting upright. To reach the minimum height of the crate, add two to four inches. It is possible to buy a taller crate, but not a longer one.

How to Select The Best Dog Crate For Your Pup

If you want to keep your dog from chewing on cords or stealing food, get the biggest crate you can fit in your space.

If you want to use a crate as a potty training aid, smaller is best. Many wire dog crates come with an insert that allows you to get the size your puppy will need when she is full grown, but keep the crate size smaller while she is little.

Get a crate large enough for your puppy to stand up, turn around, and lie down inside.

There are many styles of crates, from collapsible wire and soft-sided travel crates to hard-sided plastic and furniture-style crates.

The collapsible wire dog crates are the most versatile since I can bring them in my car or to dog shows.

If you go the wire route, you can easily cover the sides of the crate with a blanket or a crate cover. Make sure your dog has plenty of air. You don’t want your dog in a crate with no air flow.

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